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The Essential Guide to Dreamweaver CS3 with CSS, Ajax, and PHP


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The Essential Guide to Dreamweaver CS3 with CSS, Ajax, and PHP . . . Wow, the title’s almost as long as the book! And what’s that “essential” doing in there? “Essential” suggests that it’sa book you can’t do without. So, who’s it for and why should you be reading it? Dreamweaver isn’t a difficult program to use, but it’s difficult to use well. It’s packed with features, and more have been added with each new version. The user interface has barely changed in the last few versions, so it’s easy to overlook some great productivity boosters if you don’t know where to find them. I have been using Dreamweaver on a daily basis for about seven years, pushing it to the limit and finding out its good points—and its bad ones, too. So, the idea of this book is to help you get the best out of Dreamweaver CS3, with particular emphasis on building dynamic web pages using the improved CSS management features, Spry—the Adobe implementation of Ajax—and the PHP server behaviors. But how can you get the best out of this book? If you’re at home with the basics of (X)HTML and CSS, then this book is for you. If you have
never built a website before and don’t know the difference between an <a> tag and your Aunt Jemima, you’ll probably find this book a bit of a struggle. You don’t need to know every tag and attribute by heart, but I frequently dive into Code view and expect you to roll up your sleeves and get to grips with the code. It’s not coding for coding’s sake; the idea is to adapt the code generated by Dreamweaver to create websites that really work. I explain everything as I go along and steer clear of impenetrable jargon. As for CSS, you don’t need to be a candidate for inclusion in the CSS Zen Garden but you should understand the basic principles behind creating a style sheet. What about Ajax and PHP? I don’t assume any prior knowledge in these fields. Ajax comes in many different guises; the flavor used in this book is Spry, the Adobe Ajax framework (code library) that is integrated into Dreamweaver CS3. Although you do some hand-coding with Spry, most features are accessed through intuitive dialog boxes. Dreamweaver also takes care of a lot of the PHP coding, but it can’t do everything, so I show you how to customize the code it generates. Chapter 10 serves as a crash course in PHP, and
Chapter 11 puts that knowledge to immediate use by showing you how to send an email from an online form—one of the things that Dreamweaver doesn’t automate. This book doesn’t attempt to teach you how to become a PHP programmer, but by the time you reach the final chapter, you should have sufficient confidence to look a script in the eye without flinching.
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In just over a decade the Web has gone from a technology with promise to major part of the world’s infrastructure. It’s been a fascinating time, and many useful resources have been built in the process. But, as with any technology, we’ve learned as we go how best to use it and the technology itself has matured to help us use it better. However complex a web application, it finally hits the glass in the form of HTML—the universal web page description language. HTML is a computer language, albeit a very limited and specialized one. As such, if you want a system that you can evolve easily over time, you need to pay attention to writing HTML that is clear and understandable. But just like any computer language, or indeed any writing at all, it’s hard to get it right first time. Clear code comes from writing and rewriting with a determination to create something that is easy to follow. Rewriting code carries a risk of introducing bugs. Several years ago, I wrote about a technique called refactoring, which is a disciplined way of rewriting code that can greatly reduce the chances of introducing bugs while reworking software. Refactoring has made a big impact on regular software languages. Many programmers use it as part of their daily work to help them keep code clear and enhance their future productivity. Tools have sprung up to automate refactoring tasks, to further improve the workflow. Just as refactoring can make a big improvement to regular programming, the same basic idea can work with HTML. The refactoring steps are different, but the underlying philosophy is the same. By learning how to refactor your HTML, you can keep your HTML clean and easy to change into the future, allowing you to make the inevitable changes more quickly. These techniques can also allow you to bring web sites into line with the improvements in web technologies, specifically allowing you to move toward supporting XHTML and CSS. Elliotte Rusty Harold has long had a permanent place on my bookshelf for his work on XML technologies and open source software for XML processing. I’ve always respected him as a fine programmer and writer. With this book he brings the benefits of refactoring into the HTML world.

The Essential Guide to Dreamweaver CS3 with CSS, Ajax, and PHP . . . Wow, the title’s almost as long as the book! And what’s that “essential” doing in there? “Essential” suggests that it’sa book you can’t do without. So, who’s it for and why should you be reading it? Dreamweaver isn’t a difficult program to use, but it’s difficult to use well. It’s packed with features, and more have been added with each new version. The user interface has barely changed in the last few versions, so it’s easy to overlook some great productivity boosters if you don’t know where to find them. I have been using Dreamweaver on a daily basis for about seven years, pushing it to the limit and finding out its good points—and its bad ones, too. So, the idea of this book is to help you get the best out of Dreamweaver CS3, with particular emphasis on building dynamic web pages using the improved CSS management features, Spry—the Adobe implementation of Ajax—and the PHP server behaviors. But how can you get the best out of this book? If you’re at home with the basics of (X)HTML and CSS, then this book is for you. If you have
never built a website before and don’t know the difference between an <a> tag and your Aunt Jemima, you’ll probably find this book a bit of a struggle. You don’t need to know every tag and attribute by heart, but I frequently dive into Code view and expect you to roll up your sleeves and get to grips with the code. It’s not coding for coding’s sake; the idea is to adapt the code generated by Dreamweaver to create websites that really work. I explain everything as I go along and steer clear of impenetrable jargon. As for CSS, you don’t need to be a candidate for inclusion in the CSS Zen Garden but you should understand the basic principles behind creating a style sheet. What about Ajax and PHP? I don’t assume any prior knowledge in these fields. Ajax comes in many different guises; the flavor used in this book is Spry, the Adobe Ajax framework (code library) that is integrated into Dreamweaver CS3. Although you do some hand-coding with Spry, most features are accessed through intuitive dialog boxes. Dreamweaver also takes care of a lot of the PHP coding, but it can’t do everything, so I show you how to customize the code it generates. Chapter 10 serves as a crash course in PHP, and
Chapter 11 puts that knowledge to immediate use by showing you how to send an email from an online form—one of the things that Dreamweaver doesn’t automate. This book doesn’t attempt to teach you how to become a PHP programmer, but by the time you reach the final chapter, you should have sufficient confidence to look a script in the eye without flinching.

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